Childhood Influenza Vaccine Recommendations, Flu Prevention for Children, Pediatric Seasonal Flu Risk, Child Flu Resource for Families and Caregivers

 

2009-2010 Influenza Season: What Should I Do?

The 2009-2010 influenza season is unique in that there are two influenza vaccines available: one to protect against seasonal influenza and another to protect against H1N1 influenza. Look at the chart below to see which vaccine(s) you are recommended to get.

Who Should be Vaccinated
Seasonal Vaccination Recommended?
Novel H1N1 Vaccination Recommended?*

Children 6 months through 18 years of age

Yes

Yes

People 50 years of age and older

Yes

**

Pregnant women

Yes

Yes

Health care personnel

Yes

Yes

People 25 through 64 years of age with chronic medical conditions

Yes

Yes

People in close contact† with infants younger than 6 months of age

Yes

Yes

People any age with chronic medical conditions

Yes

**

People in close contact with those at higher risk for complications from influenza

Yes

**

Young adults 19 through 24 years of age

§

Yes


* Vaccination of target groups should begin as soon as vaccine is available.
** CDC will advise on extending vaccination to these groups following efforts focused on initial targeted groups.
Including, but not limited to, diabetes, asthma, heart disease and compromised immune system.For a complete list, visit http://www.cdc.gov/flu.
Close contacts include those who live with or provide direct care to people at risk.
§ Seasonal vaccine can be administered to anyone older than 6 months who wants to reduce the risk of getting influenza or passing it on to others.

 

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