Prevent Childhood Influenza, Resources About Influenza / Flu Vaccines, Flu Prevention in Children, Flu Vaccine and Vaccination Recommendations

 

Glossary

  • Childhood Influenza / Flu - Influenza, also called the flu, is a contagious viral infection of the nose, throat and lungs that spreads easily from person to person. Influenza tends to spread in a predictable, or “seasonal,” pattern across the U.S. each year, with increased activity from October through May and cases typically peaking around February. In spring 2009, a new influenza virus known as influenza A (H1N1) or “swine flu” also began circulating. Influenza (flu) is serious. Seasonal flu causes approximately 20,000 hospitalizations and nearly 100 deaths each year in American children younger than 5 years of age. Anyone can get the flu, but rates of infection are highest among children.

  • Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition (CIIC) - A coalition made up of more than 30 of the nation’s leading public health, medical, patient and parent groups. The Coalition’s mission is to protect infants, children and adolescents from the flu by communicating with “one strong voice” the need to make influenza immunization a national health priority.

  • CIIC – See Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition.

  • H1N1 Influenza / Flu – In spring 2009, a new influenza virus known as novel influenza A (H1N1) or “swine” flu began circulating. This new H1N1 virus continued to circulate at higher than usual rates (for flu) throughout the summer and autumn months of 2009, and because of its ease of transmission was declared a pandemic.

  • Immunization / Vaccination Resources – The Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition’s resources include educational materials about influenza (also called the flu), influenza prevention, immunization recommendations and vaccine options, appropriate for families/caregivers, health care professionals and media.

  • Influenza / Flu Prevention – Annual vaccination with the influenza vaccine is safe and the best way to prevent influenza, also called the flu.

  • Influenza / Flu Resources – See Immunization / Vaccination Resources.

  • Influenza / Flu Risk (Seasonal) – Everyone is at risk for influenza, also called the flu. Some people, such as children, people with certain chronic medical conditions (e.g., asthma, diabetes) and the elderly, are at higher risk for developing complications, which can lead to hospitalization and even death. Influenza vaccination is safe and the best way to prevent influenza.

  • Influenza / Flu Vaccination / Vaccine Options – The injectable vaccine or “flu shot” includes inactivated (“killed”) influenza viruses and is administered with a needle, usually in the arm. The flu shot is approved for use in anyone older than 6 months of age including healthy people, pregnant women and people with chronic medical conditions. The nasal-spray vaccine includes live but weakened influenza viruses and is sprayed into the nose. This vaccine is approved for use in healthy people 2 to 49 years of age.

  • Influenza / Flu Vaccination Recommendations (H1N1) – The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has prioritized specific groups for vaccination, including children and young adults 6 months through 24 years of age, pregnant women, healthcare workers, people 25 through 64 years of age with certain chronic medical conditions (e.g., asthma, diabetes) and people in close contact with infants younger than 6 months of age. CDC will advise when H1N1 influenza vaccination should be expanded beyond these groups.

  • Influenza / Flu Vaccination Recommendations (Seasonal) – Influenza vaccination is recommended for anyone who wants to protect themselves and their close contacts from influenza. Annual influenza vaccination is the best way to prevent influenza, also called the flu. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends vaccination for any adult who wants to reduce their risk of becoming ill with influenza or of transmitting influenza to others. In addition, the CDC specifically recommends influenza vaccination for all children 6 months through 18 years of age, people with certain chronic medical conditions (e.g., asthma, diabetes) and people 50 years of age and older. Influenza vaccination is also recommended for pregnant women, healthcare workers and close contacts of high-risk groups.

  • National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) – An organization dedicated to educating the public and healthcare professionals about the causes, treatment and prevention of infectious diseases. The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases is a long-time advocate for annual influenza immunization and participates in a number of programs and partnerships supporting public health messages about immunization. The National Foundation for Infectious Diseases is the founder of the Childhood Influenza Immunization Coalition.

  • Swine Flu – See H1N1 Influenza / Flu.

CIIC is made possible by unrestricted educational grants to NFID from Novartis Vaccines and sanofi pasteur.
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